Tribal Trance Dance – Various Artists

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Album Review by EDF

Regular readers of the independent artist section will know by now about my appreciation of most things that come from the Music Mosaic label. That is not to say that this review will be biased but I will bring up the point that I have criticised the odd below standard track previously found on these compilations. I do enjoy these compilations very much and hope that you will explore them as well if like the old mixed with the modern.

The opening track is ‘Xingu’ by PROFESSOR TRANCE who commences the proceeding with a lesson of all things tribal accompanied by a constant repetitive beat. This moves to the drum & bass influenced ‘Hamu’ by FRIEDEL LELONEK who uses djembe and darbuka in an attempt to make the track more interesting than it really is. Next up is one of the most commercial tracks ever to be found on a Music Mosaic compilation, the enjoyable Oriental-pop track ‘Razali’ by ZEHAVA BEN. I would defy anyone not to like this track or the next one, ‘Calango’ by KAU.

’Tribal Trance Dance’ by KAMAL ENGELS / ARIEL KALMA is a kind of tribal celebration of song and dance featuring Native American Indians. Next up is ‘Taniye’ by BEKAYE KOUYATE & SONKOMA, which is based on a traditional Mali song and covers topics such as human rights and having fun with your friends. This track does show some promise but ultimately fails to excite. This would not be a world music album without featuring some didgeridoos and ‘Rhythm Culture’ by DIDJWORKS does the job by fusing trance, urban, world, jazz and funk elements into the one track.

Patience, tolerance, understanding and agreement is the message portrayed in ‘Akoma’ by ADESA, which is suitably matched by the song’s mid-tempo beats. The percussion intro at the start of ‘Fou La Tete’ by ARIEL KALMA will catch the listener unaware that this is a percussion only track and sounds far more interesting than it should be. The main sentiments expressed in ‘Earthsong’ by KARUNESH, no, not the Michael Jackson song, is that everything comes from Mother Earth and that is where, one day, everything will eventually return. The final track on the album is ‘Gate Keeper’ by ATMAN who apparently makes the best traditional Indian chants and ambience, and judging from this track that description is not far wrong.

Yet again a near perfect compilation except for a couple of tracks that refuse to get going. As always, if you have any interest in World Music, than you should check out Music Mosaic’s website and sample some of the other delights that they have to offer.

5 stars